Fifth Class: Proportion

Brief group discussion of finished “transformation drawings”

In-class assignment one (no math or measuring):

  • Draw a rectangle in your sketchbook. Without measuring, draw the same rectangle 10 more times in various sizes from tiny to very large
  • Draw a rectangle in your sketchbook. Without measuring, divide the rectangle into a square plus a leftover smaller rectangle (a long rectangle might consist of two or more squares). Draw the rectangle 10 more times in various sizes from tiny to very large.
  • In your sketchbook, draw the chalkboard, wall or windows in the class. Before you start, judge the relative proportions by closing one eye and holding out your pencil with a locked elbow, to see how wide the chalkboard is compared to its height. I will demonstrate in class how to do this. Ask yourself “how many times does the height fit in to the width?’ Two times? One and a half?
  • optional: Draw the chalkboard, wall or windows again but much bigger.
  • optional: Choose a large object in the room. Imagine the object fitting into a rectangle of a particular shape. Judge the relative proportions by holding out your pencil. Draw a rectangle with these proportions on a page in your sketchbook as large as possible, then observe and draw the object inside the rectangle.

In-class assignment two (some math and measuring)

http://www.basic-mathematics.com/proportion-calculator.html

  • Crop one of the photographs you brought in to improve the composition. Use a ruler and draw a rectangle on the photo. Measure the rectangle.
  • Using cross multiplication or a proportion calculator, or double or triple your measurements. Measure and draw a large rectangle of the same proportions on a large sheet of cartridge paper.
  • Divide both the small photo rectangle and the large rectangle into four using the corner to corner method to find the centre point. Divide the rectangle into four (draw two diagonal lines from corner to corner, then draw vertical and horizontal lines that meet at the centre point) Without measuring, draw the same rectangle (divided in four) Divide each quadrant the same way. You can further divide any area that has a lot of detail.
  • Use whatever medium seems appropriate and “size up” your photo carefully observing the shapes you see in each section. Look at both negative and positive shapes.
  • Check the accuracy of your drawing by standing back several feet and “sight-size” by holding up your source photo at arms length, making it appear the same size as your larger drawing.

Homework: In your sketchbook, draw two rectangles that are much smaller than your photo source. Keep the same proportion. Make two quick drawings based on your photo source. Also, In your sketchbook draw an outdoor structure (sculpture, totem pole, architectural feature of a building, an entire building, etc.) in two different sizes. Imagine the structure fitting into a rectangle of a particular shape. Judge the relative proportions by holding out your pencil. Draw a rectangle with these proportions then observe and draw the object inside the rectangle.

Your drawing based on one of the artists in the presentations will be due in two weeks, so start thinking about/working on it.

Bring for next class: Sketchbooks, cartridge paper, pencils, erasers, and a large ruler. Find and watch online videos reviewing one point and two point perspective.

 

 

 

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