Fifth Class: Proportion

Brief group discussion of finished “transformation drawings”

In-class assignment one (no math or measuring):

  • Draw a rectangle in your sketchbook. Without measuring, draw the same rectangle 10 more times in various sizes from tiny to very large
  • Draw a rectangle in your sketchbook. Without measuring, divide the rectangle into a square plus a leftover smaller rectangle (a long rectangle might consist of two or more squares). Draw the rectangle 10 more times in various sizes from tiny to very large.
  • In your sketchbook, draw the chalkboard, wall or windows in the class. Before you start, judge the relative proportions by closing one eye and holding out your pencil with a locked elbow, to see how wide the chalkboard is compared to its height. I will demonstrate in class how to do this. Ask yourself “how many times does the height fit in to the width?’ Two times? One and a half?
  • optional: Draw the chalkboard, wall or windows again but much bigger.
  • optional: Choose a large object in the room. Imagine the object fitting into a rectangle of a particular shape. Judge the relative proportions by holding out your pencil. Draw a rectangle with these proportions on a page in your sketchbook as large as possible, then observe and draw the object inside the rectangle.

In-class assignment two (some math and measuring)

http://www.basic-mathematics.com/proportion-calculator.html

  • Crop one of the photographs you brought in to improve the composition. Use a ruler and draw a rectangle on the photo. Measure the rectangle.
  • Using cross multiplication or a proportion calculator, or double or triple your measurements. Measure and draw a large rectangle of the same proportions on a large sheet of cartridge paper.
  • Divide both the small photo rectangle and the large rectangle into four using the corner to corner method to find the centre point. Divide the rectangle into four (draw two diagonal lines from corner to corner, then draw vertical and horizontal lines that meet at the centre point) Without measuring, draw the same rectangle (divided in four) Divide each quadrant the same way. You can further divide any area that has a lot of detail.
  • Use whatever medium seems appropriate and “size up” your photo carefully observing the shapes you see in each section. Look at both negative and positive shapes.
  • Check the accuracy of your drawing by standing back several feet and “sight-size” by holding up your source photo at arms length, making it appear the same size as your larger drawing.

Homework: In your sketchbook, draw two rectangles that are much smaller than your photo source. Keep the same proportion. Make two quick drawings based on your photo source. Also, In your sketchbook draw an outdoor structure (sculpture, totem pole, architectural feature of a building, an entire building, etc.) in two different sizes. Imagine the structure fitting into a rectangle of a particular shape. Judge the relative proportions by holding out your pencil. Draw a rectangle with these proportions then observe and draw the object inside the rectangle.

Your drawing based on one of the artists in the presentations will be due in two weeks, so start thinking about/working on it.

Bring for next class: Sketchbooks, cartridge paper, pencils, erasers, and a large ruler. Find and watch online videos reviewing one point and two point perspective.

 

 

 

Fourth Class: Student Presentations

10 minute presentations

Come prepared with images or Powerpoint on a USB stick or SD card. Show how your chosen artist uses drawing in their art practice.

Pamela: Art21.org: Matthew Ritchie: Information, Cells, and Evil. Also many photographs of his art at Matthew Ritchie Universal Cell. In the Art21 interview he discusses his process which begins with drawing.

The Drawing Process

A Few Ideas from Matthew Ritchie

  1. Start with ideas – create motifs related to the ideas – ( he was

interested in the structures of cells and so he started drawing

cells). Use your emotions and your sense of your body in space

for additional information.

  1. Visit galleries and museums and draw diagrams of artwork. For

example Ritchie is interested in how Renaissance Tapestry

artist’s used space and so he likes to draw diagrams of

Renaissance tapestrys. Then he draws diagrams of the diagrams.

  1. Research your ideas. Ritchie reads and studies architecture,

chemistry, biology, physics, theology, mythology, music,

geography, etc., searching for new ideas.

  1. Generate lists of related themes and ideas – make links, and do

more research.

  1. Create motifs related to these new ideas.
  2. Draw all your motifs and layer them on top of one of another and

from this “ visual information” pull out forms that will build

structures.

  1. Further research shapes, geometrys and forms in architecture,

physics, biology, mythology, religions, geography, literature,

other paintings, crafts, – whatever interests you and glue

together disparate ideas but stay committed to a whole.

  1. Learn how technology can enhance one’s drawings

Matt:comic book artist Paul Chadwick. Chadwick uses heavy black areas and cross hatching to render realistic and fantastical elements, often combining nature and science fiction.  Time Magazine: http://content.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1070506,00.html

Claudia: Edgar Arceneaux. Link 1: from an art museum in LA affiliated to the University of California.  https://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/2003/hammer-projects-edgar-arceneaux/ Link 2: from the webpage Art21: https://www.art21.org/artists/edgar-arceneaux
The video is also from Art 21: http://www.pbs.org/program/art21/

Meira: William Kentridge

Cole: Marco Mazzoni.  http://warholian.com/2012/01/marco-mazzoni/

http://hifructose.com/2012/08/07/inside-the-sketchbook-of-artist-marco-mazzoni/

https://www.odalisquemagazine.com/articles/2013/07/04/interview-marco-mazzoni-written-by-marie-brunnberg

Celeste: heather hansen HEATHER HANSEN

Artist Uses Dance Movements To Create Stunning Charcoal Drawings

Carla: Artist : Kellie O’Dempsey (PERFORMANCE DRAWING INSTALLATION ARTIST)

Link:   http://www.kellieo.com/

Emma: Ethiopian-American artist Julie Mehretu.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2007/11/11/arts/design/11shee.html

http://whitecube.com/artists/julie_mehretu/

Melissa: Alphonse Mucha, the Czech Art Nouveau painter.

Ann: David Hockney

Bill: William Haefeli. He is a cartoonist in the New Yorker.William Haefeli

Lyn: David Blackwood. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cPSvmFkK4E

http://www.pendulumgallery.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/David-Blackwood_Media-Release_Pendulum-Gallery.pdf

This youtube video has an interview with Blackwood.  If you scroll along to 9:50 he is drawing beside the water for a painting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4t38sza60w

This CBC interview is about Blackwood moving into painting as the next stage of his work.  At 1:40 there is a shot of a sketch he did to plan a painting.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/artist-david-blackwood-finds-freedom-in-old-age-1.1313546

Next is a youtube video of the process of etching a copper plate for printing.  This shows how the drawing is transferred to the plate.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBvSUuxxevk

Scott:

Homework: Choose an object that is meaningful to you or symbolic in some way. In your sketchbook do a blind contour drawing of it every day this week. Also photograph the object several times in mid-air and print out two of the best images in black and white, as large as possible, on regular 8 1/2″ x 11″ paper and bring to class. Bring a large ruler (18″ or larger), Cartridge paper, pencils, charcoal, black conté, erasers. ****Bring your drawings from last week for a brief crit.

In class next week, we will be enlarging (sizing up) your photo, using a grid, as well as reducing the scale (making several  small drawings based on your image). Get familiar with calculating relative proportions for gridding purposes. Here is a link to a simple proportion calculator (I will explain more in class):

http://www.basic-mathematics.com/proportion-calculator.html

 

 

 

Third Class: The Object Disguised

Bring an interesting object and materials to disguise your object. This week we will be disguising an object to look like another object. Use one sheet of Stonehenge and divide the surface into 6 sections. Use pencil and eraser. I suggest using a combination of contour drawing and shading or hatching. I am open to other ideas if you want to use other materials.

Bring your shadow box drawings for a short group critique at the beginning of class. You do not need to bring your shadow box for this class.

Class assignment: draw the object, then do a series of 5 or 6 (or more) drawings documenting the transformation into another object. Think about meaning–what does it mean to change an angel into a devil, a hawk into a dove etc?

You will have the whole class for this assignment.

Homework: Finish your series of drawings for homework. The student presentations will be next week on Feb 10th. Come prepared with images or powerpoint on a USB stick or SD card. Show how your artist uses drawing in their art practice and explain how they push the boundaries of how drawing is used and what drawing can be. See last week’s post for instructions.

Second Class: Still life with Shadow Box

Here’s an invitation to my upcoming show Friday at Deluge:

Deluge Contemporary Art, Victoria BC. Neil McClelland: Everything is Being Perfected, opening reception Feb 3, 7 PM. Continues to Mar 4, 2017

inthewesttheskycontracted2016

Instructions for Feb 10 (Fourth Class) student presentations:

What Can Drawing Be?

Prepare a five to ten minute presentation about a contemporary, living artist who uses drawing in some way in their art practice. The goal is for the class to research and share ideas about how artists use drawing today, and how they often push the boundaries of how drawing can be defined.

By Feb 3: Send me an email with the name of your chosen artist along with one or two links to

an article about the artist in an art magazine or newspaper

or

a page about the artist from a major gallery or art museum

Example:

I have chosen the work of Scottish artist Charles Avery. Here are two links, one from an art museum in Rotterdam, and one from the Guardian newspaper:

http://www.boijmans.nl/en/7/kalender/calendaritem/273/charles-avery#FoJscd36HdRMrR2i.97

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2008/sep/17/charles.avery

The presentations will be on February 10th. Come prepared with images or powerpoint on a USB stick. Show how this artist uses drawing in their art practice.

Today’s Class:

In class drawings:

Concepts: Eye-hand coordination (Blind contour). Line Weight. Value.

  1. Drawing one. Pencil and white cartridge paper. Set up your shadow box and light it. Do a blind contour drawing, starting with the outside contours of the entire box, and then every detail of the interior. Imagine the point of a pencil in mid-air touching the edges of all the shapes (including shadow shapes), and match the motion of the imagined pencil point with the actual pencil in your drawing hand. Do not look at your paper or drawing hand. Do not lift the pencil off the paper. Use a variety of line weights by digging in deeper or keeping a light touch. Slower is better. This process should take a long time.
  2. Drawing Two. Pencil and white cartridge paper.On a full sheet of cartridge paper (18″ x 24″) do a modified or semi-blind contour drawing in the same way, but this time you can “cheat”. Look mostly at the subject, but every ten seconds or so look at your drawing and reposition your pencil. Draw everything, including all shadow shapes.
  3. Drawing Three. Vine and compressed charcoal and a full or half sheet (your choice) of Stonehenge paper.If using a half sheet, fold the paper short end to short end, crease and carefully tear along the seam. Focus only on the interior of the box.  Do a value drawing, trying to get a full range of values from bright white to deepest black. Avoid lines or contours. Use erasers a lot as a drawing tool.

Homework: Finish these three drawings. Do a fourth drawing based on your shadow box. Using pencil in your sketchbook, focus in on one or two details and draw in as much detail as you can. Light the box dramatically. Use the side of your pencil to shade in values or use hatching or cross hatching. Do a fifth drawing based your shadow box on a found surface  and do something unusual or unexpected. Bring all your drawings in for next class for a short group critique.

Also bring for next class: An interesting object and materials to disguise your object. Next week we will be disguising an object to look like another object. We will first draw the object, then do a series of 5 or 6 (or more) drawings documenting the transformation into another object. Think about meaning–what does it mean to change an angel into a devil, a hawk into a dove etc? Use one sheet of Stonehenge and divide the surface into 6 sections. Use pencil. Use a combination of contour drawing and shading or hatching. I am open to other ideas if you want to use other materials.

First Class: Review and Still Life

***Please note that I will be away for the second class, Jan 20, and am rescheduling the class during the VISA spring break week (Feb 24th).

Introduction. Class overview (see slides below for details).

For this class: Bring two objects to class, two objects that are related, but somehow opposites. Be prepared to make a case for seeing them as being both related and opposite. For instance cup/ball: These objects are opposites because a cup has a rounded void inside it, whereas a ball is a rounded solid form. They are related because they are of a similar size, take up about the same amount of space, and they both have the quality of roundness.
Another example, knife/fork: These objects are opposites because they are used for opposite purposes, the knife is for cutting apart, and the fork is for gathering up. They are related because they are both similar in size, and they are both utensils used for eating.
If possible please bring a few options, so you have a choice as to what you will draw in class, and so there will be extras just in case. Also bring something to blindfold yourself with.

In-class assignment one: Drawing with a tactile object

Creating a direct route of communication between your two hands

Make several similar drawings repeating the following set of instructions:

1)Examine one of your objects in silence for about 3 minutes

2)In the margin of your paper, write a detailed description (size, weight, colour, textures etc.)

3)Blindfold yourself—no peeking

4)Use a range of pencil marks with your drawing hand that describes what your other hand is feeling

5)Push and pull, twist, dig, turn, press hard or light, dots, dashes, smudges, whatever is appropriate to what you are touching with your other hand

6)Take off your blindfold. Put the object out of sight and draw it from memory (remembering your initial description and using your most successful kinds of marks)

7)Repeat with the other object.

In-class assignment 2: Using pencil, observe both objects together and draw them using the kind of marks that you made while blindfolded. Finish for homework if no time in class. Give your drawing a title.

Homework: Create a Joseph Cornell  or Arman style shadow box. Make or find a box and create a portable, stable, still life inside it. Think about controlling a light source to make the lighting and shadows consistent whether you are at home or in class.

For next class: Bring your still life drawings and put it up for a brief class discussion. Bring your shadow box, a small lamp or light source, and extension cord if possible. Bring soft vine or willow charcoal, and compressed charcoal, kneadable and white erasers, Cartridge pad, one sheet of Stonehenge.

Links for grey paper options:

Opus

Strathmore Series 500 Charcoal paper Storm Grey

https://store.opusartsupplies.com/sagro/storefront/store.php?mode=showproductdetail&product=13497

Art Again Gotham Grey

https://store.opusartsupplies.com/sagro/storefront/store.php?mode=showproductdetail&product=13492

Island Blue

CANSON MI-TEINTES PAPERS PEARL GREY

http://www.islandblue.com/store/product/13023/CANSON-MI-TEINTES-PAPERS-PALE-YELLOW/

TIZIANO PEARL GRAY 19.5X25.5

http://www.islandblue.com/store/product/21859/TIZIANO-BANANA-PAPER19.5X25.5/

CANFORD PAPER – COVER WEIGHT 20X30 DREADNOUGHT

http://www.islandblue.com/store/product/12209/CANFORD-PAPER-COVER-WEIGHT-20X30-AMETHYST/